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Overview of partial nephrectomy techniques: influence of technology

Traditionally, radical nephrectomy was the preferred operation for kidney cancer, while partial nephrectomy was reserved for specific circumstances and essential indications such as a tumour in a solitary kidney, bilateral kidney tumours, or severe chronic kidney disease (CKD). Given the...

Why bother? Metabolic screening for stone formers

Introduction Despite the considerable increase in the incidence of stone disease in the UK and elsewhere in recent years, urologists have engaged with preventative strategies to only a limited degree. With mounting evidence of the strong correlation between obesity and...

COVID-19 and acute kidney injury

Newspapers and online media are full of the effects of the coronavirus on airways and olfactory functions and the importance of respiratory physicians (pulmonologists in the USA), ventilators and intensive care teams. However, as per the Intensive Care National Audit...

Pyonephrosis: is the kidney always doomed?

Pyonephrosis (Greek pyon ‘pus’ + nephros ‘kidney’) is defined in Campbell-Walsh Urology [1] as an infected hydro-nephrosis associated with suppurative destruction of the renal parenchyma which results in total or near total loss of renal function. The true incidence of...

A guide to percutaneous nephrolithotomy

Percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) is now the gold standard approach to treating large renal stones. Since its development in the 1970s, it has undergone a series of refinements that could only have been possible with the symbiosis of both radiological and...

Assessment of the incidental adrenal lesion

Introduction The adrenal glands are seen on CT or MRI surrounded by fat in the peri-renal space. The right adrenal gland lies medial to the right lobe of the liver, lateral to the right crus of the diaphragm and superior...

A guide for the assessment and management of post-obstructive diuresis

Acute urinary retention is a common condition encountered in the emergency situation and is initially managed by urethral catheterisation. This is often performed by nursing staff or junior doctors. Post-obstructive diuresis (POD) is a specific entity which may occur post...

David Newman

In this series of articles I am going to show you some of the exhibits contained in the Museum of Urology, hosted on the BAUS website (www.baus.org.uk). In the last article I said I would write on a Scottish theme...

Demanding cases or nightmares in endourology? Sep/Oct 2016

In this issue the authors will present once in a career cases that can truly haunt a urologist. “Mistakes are like bad loves, the more you learn from them, the more you wish they’d never happened. “ Gregory David Roberts*...

Early British pioneers of urological imaging

In this series of articles I am going to show you some of the exhibits contained in the Museum of Urology, hosted on the BAUS website (www.baus.org.uk). In this article I am joined by Gavin Gordon of Newcastle University whose...

HIV / AIDS – implications for the urologist

“It’s no fun to have HIV even though it’s viewed as a chronic, controllable disease. It means being wedded to the health system.” - Philip Berger, Associate Professor in the Department of Family and Community Medicine, Toronto, Canada; and leading...

All you need to know about percutaneous nephrolithotomy: supine versus prone and mini versus traditional

Introduction Since the first percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL), the technique has undergone many innovations, including modifications in positioning, miniaturisation of instruments and combination with retrograde intra-renal surgery (see Table 1 for an outline of the history of the technique). Controversy has...