You searched for "ESWL"

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ESWL and URS for treatment of paediatric urolithiasis

Tejwani et al. have undertaken a comparative effectiveness study to characterise differences in procedure frequency, postoperative re-admissions and emergency room (ER) visits, and repeat treatment rates for children (≤18 years) with urolithiasis who underwent initial intervention with extracorporeal shock wave...

Stepwise voltage ramping causes less renal haematomas than fixed maximal voltage ESWL

Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) remains the recommended first line treatment for stones <2cm in the renal pelvis and upper or mid-pole calyces (Türk C, Knoll T, Petrik A, et al. European Association of Urology Guidelines on Urolithiasis. 2014). There...

The management of renal calculi – Pt 1

Renal calculi can be managed according to four treatment options: conservative management, extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL), flexible ureterorenoscopy (FURS) and percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL). This is the first in a two-part series in Urology News (Part 2 available here) that will...

Efficacy of flexible ureteroscopy and laser lithotripsy for lower pole renal calculi

The management of lower pole renal stones (LPS) is often difficult. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL), flexible ureterorenoscopy (fURS) and percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) are all potential options with potential benefits and disadvantages. In order to assess the success of fURS...

An update on lower pole stone management for 2015

Introduction Urolithiasis is an increasing healthcare problem, with an estimated lifetime prevalence of up to 15% [1]. The number of interventions undertaken for stone disease has increased dramatically over recent years, particularly with respect to ureteroscopy and percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL)...

Read all about it Nov/Dec 2020

Read all about it... It can be awkward when a patient asks you about a report in their favourite tabloid detailing an amazing research breakthrough or a ‘cutting-edge’ new treatment / test and you don’t know what they are talking...

The management of renal calculi – Pt 2

Renal calculi can be managed according to four treatment options: conservative management, extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL), flexible ureterorenoscopy (FURS) and percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL). Having addressed conservative management and ESWL in the last edition of Urology News, the second article...

Urinary tract stones

Case 1 What does this plain X-ray of kidneys, ureters and bladder (KUB) show? What, according to the 2009 The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidelines, is the most appropriate first-line treatment? What factors do the NICE...

Management of calyceal diverticular stones using ultramini PCNL

Calyceal diverticulae are congenital smooth-walled, non-secretory urothelium-lined cavities within the renal parenchyma that communicate with calyceal fornix through a diverticular neck. They were first described by Rayer in Traitements des maladies des reins [1]. Calculi occur in approximately 9.5% to...

Urinary tract infections and antibiotics – the debate goes on

A large number of hospital patients and primary care patients suffer from recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI) and urosepsis. Some of these patients end up in intensive care units with multi-organ failure. New draft guidance from the National Institute for...

Non-antibiotic options for recurrent UTI

Recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI) imposes a heavy burden on health services. By definition recurrent UTI is two infections in six months or three in one year. The annual incidence of single UTI is 30 per 1000 women. The Scottish...

Andrology (2020)

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