You searched for "small renal masses"

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The Management of Small Renal Masses

I enjoyed reading this book and was surprised at how much practically useful information was contained within such a slim volume. The 171-page volume was easy to read in its entirety in a short space of time. It’s small enough...

Modern management of small renal masses

With the advent of widespread cross-sectional imaging there has been a surge in incidental detection of small renal masses (SRMs) and renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is now the seventh most common cancer in the UK. Whilst surgical excision for larger...

Small renal masses – diagnosis and management

Renal cancer is the eighth most common cancer in the UK and accounts for about 3% of all new cancer diagnoses [1]. The incidence rates are steadily rising, with the highest rates being in older men and women. This rise...

Active surveillance for small renal masses in younger patients

Active surveillance (AS) is discussed as an option for renal masses <2cm in patients with significant competing risks for mortality. This multicentre data from the US seeks to fill an important gap in current guidelines for provision of this option...

Cryotherapy for small renal masses: better than surveillance?

With the rapid rise in incidental small renal mass detection, some of which have malignant potential, comes the need to either survey or treat these masses safely and with minimal morbidity. This large series of 147 patients with 171 masses,...

Thermal ablative techniques for small renal masses

The incidence of renal cell carcinoma has increased over the past decade which can be partly attributed to the increased use of imaging modalities [1,2]. Nephron sparing procedures for the management of small renal tumours have gained popularity which include...

Is routine renal tumour biopsy associated with lower rates of benign histology following nephrectomy for small renal masses?

There has been a considerable increase in the detection of small renal masses (SRM). Approximately 20% of these turn out to be benign lesions on final histopathological analysis. Therefore upfront surgery can be overtreatment in such a group of patients....