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Factors associated with post ureteroscopy urosepsis

The authors investigate which factors were most likely to increase the risk of postoperative urosepsis within 28 days of ureteroscopy (URS) and laser stone fragmentation by analysing the 34 of 562 patients who developed this complication. Stone size, same session...

Imaging and Intervention in Urinary Tract Infections and Urosepsis

Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are highly prevalent in the community and account for approximately 40% of hospital-acquired infections. Yet, they are often underestimated and under-diagnosed: as one chapter of this book is entitled, nothing is simple about acute pyelonephritis. This...

Sepsis syndrome in urology

There are approximately 100,000 cases of sepsis per year in the UK, of which 37,000 result in death (this is more than prostate cancer, breast cancer, HIV / AIDS and road traffic accidents combined). Urosepsis is defined as sepsis caused...

Urinary tract infections and antibiotics – the debate goes on

A large number of hospital patients and primary care patients suffer from recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI) and urosepsis. Some of these patients end up in intensive care units with multi-organ failure. New draft guidance from the National Institute for...

Clean catch urine from babies – the ‘quick wee method’

Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common in children and babies and can lead to urosepsis, renal scarring and chronic kidney disease. As per American Academy of Pediatrics guidelines, urine samples are a must in febrile / unwell infants even if...

Sepsis and antibiotics: the debate goes on

Sepsis statistics are staggering around the world. The UK Sepsis Trust estimates that there are around 150,000 cases of sepsis in the UK every year and it kills 44,000 patients per year. There are many different definitions and criteria; in...

Percutaneous ultrasound guided endoscopic lavage of perinephric abscess – different, but not necessarily better

Perinephric abscess is an uncommon but serious form of urosepsis. It develops as a consequence of the extension of an infection outside of the parenchyma of the kidney in acute pyelonephritis, or more rarely from haematogeneous spread of an infection...

Is TRUS and biopsy obsolete as a diagnostic test for prostate cancer: refining the perineal biopsy technique?

Whilst there has been a dramatic shift in how patients are investigated for potential prostate cancer, transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) and biopsy remains the most commonly used technique for tissue sampling. In this single centre, retrospective analysis, 634 men, over a...

I wasn’t expecting that! A series of unexpected radiology findings

Case 1 A 76-year-old diabetic man with a long-term catheter presents to the Emergency Department with rigors and non-specific abdominal pain. He has an elevated white cell count (WCC) and C-reactive protein (CRP). An abdominal and pelvic CT scan was...

Demanding cases or nightmares in endourology? Nov/Dec 2017

Case 1 A 78-year-old male was transferred from a referring hospital. He had a cystectomy and ileal conduit performed 15 years previously and had recently been admitted with a clinical diagnosis of an infected obstructed kidney. The referring hospital had...

Role of emergency ureteroscopy in the management of ureteric stones

Emergency ureteroscopy for all acute stone patients is not widespread in the UK but this is not the case elsewhere. In Auckland, New Zealand, it is commonly carried out in the emergency setting to reduce pressure on elective lists and...

Efficacy of flexible ureteroscopy and laser lithotripsy for lower pole renal calculi

The management of lower pole renal stones (LPS) is often difficult. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL), flexible ureterorenoscopy (fURS) and percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) are all potential options with potential benefits and disadvantages. In order to assess the success of fURS...