The expanding indications for ureteroscopy – ad maiora!

The management of urolithiasis is becoming a Herculean task for healthcare providers worldwide. The incidence of stone disease is rising, with predicted lifetime risk of 12% in males and 6% in females [1]. This rise relates to both improving imaging...

Getting it Right First Time in urology: the implementation phase

The Getting it Right First Time (GIRFT) programme is the largest and most comprehensive initiative to improve the quality and efficiency of individual clinical services that the NHS has ever instigated. The programme falls under the auspices of NHS Improvement...

A negative ureteroscopy for stone disease: is it acceptable and is it avoidable?

Urinary tract stone disease and the consequent demand for endoscopic intervention in the upper urinary tract is an increasing phenomenon [1]. Although ureteroscopy is generally considered to be associated with low morbidity [2], risks do exist. Recognised complications include urothelial...

Dietary citrate substitution in urolithiasis patients

Stone formation is dependent on supersaturation of urinary salts and urinary crystal retention. Urinary promoters (protein aggregates, cell debris) and inhibitors (citrate, magnesium, urinary macromolecules such as glycosaminoglycans and proteins) are involved in the process of stone formation [1]. Hypocitraturia...

The management of renal calculi – Pt 2

Renal calculi can be managed according to four treatment options: conservative management, extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL), flexible ureterorenoscopy (FURS) and percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL). Having addressed conservative management and ESWL in the last edition of Urology News, the second article...

Training to be a urologist: how risky is it?

The NHS and urology face challenging times in trying to provide quality patient care efficiently and economically. Urology trainees are experiencing conflicting pressures with a new contract, a challenging on-call system and changing training requirements in an overstretched, centralised service...

The management of renal calculi – Pt 1

Renal calculi can be managed according to four treatment options: conservative management, extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL), flexible ureterorenoscopy (FURS) and percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL). This is the first in a two-part series in Urology News (Part 2 available here) that will...

The role of conservative renal colic treatment

Acute renal colic is a common emergency condition, which can arise from a variety of underlying conditions that affect the urinary tract, but it is usually associated with the passage of ureteral stones. Before considering expectant management or active intervention,...

Simulation-based training of procedural skills: application and integration of educational theories

Educational theories: how familiar are we with these theories and their application in our training? As a Simulation Fellow I have been involved in teaching specific procedural skills and running full immersion simulation sessions. This experience has exposed me to...

Metabolic screening and stone-prevention in urolithiasis patients

The incidence and prevalence of kidney stones is increasing [1,2]. Significant recurrence rates are noted with 14% of patients experiencing a further episode at one year, 35% at five years, and 52% at 10 years [3]. Over 10% of stone...

The scent of Ethiopia: a personal story part 2

In the May/June 16 print issue of Urology News (available online here) we featured a wonderful account of Zeeshan Aslam’s first trip with Urolink to the Hawassa Referral Hospital in Ethiopia. One year on we are delighted that Zeeshan has...

Consent: your obligations in the modern, post-Montgomery era

There has been so much recent discussion and so much emphasis placed on the fundamental right that we all have to determine what is or is not done to us, the right to self-determination, that it would be either a...

  • 1 (current)
  • 2
  • 3