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Use of bone windows in urological CT

Introduction Unenhanced computed tomography of kidneys, ureter and bladder (CTKUB) is the recommended gold standard investigation in patients with acute renal colic. CT urography is now a commonly used technique in the investigation of haematuria, for surgical planning and for...

The evaluation of CT urography in the haematuria clinic

This retrospective study examined the records of 1000 patients attending a haematuria clinic over a two-year period. All patients over 40 with visible (VH) or non-visible haematuria (NVH) had a computed tomography urogram (CTU) and a flexible cystoscopy (if not...

The role of PET-CT imaging in prostate cancer

Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second most common cancer in the UK, with 43,000 cases in 2017-18 [1,2]. Accurate primary staging and the detection of suspected recurrence following treatment is vital for directing management and predicting prognosis. This has conventionally...

Renal calculi composition – Hounsfield units or dual energy CT?

In this, the inaugural uro-radiology article, Jane Belfield (Section Editor) considers the significance of Hounsfield units in defining stone composition. Despite its widespread adoption and referencing in stone MDTs, there are some very clear limitations. Jane explores the potential role...

Can PET/CT help in selecting treatment for patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer more appropriately?

Radical cystectomy is one of the most drastic procedures that urological patients have to undergo with a five-year mortality of around 50% in those with organ-confined disease at presentation. Traditional imaging is with contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) but lymphadenectomy often...

Does more equal less in the management of acute renal colic?

Radiographs of kidneys, ureter and bladder (KUB) have long been used in the follow-up of patients with ureteral stones to reassess stone position and surgical planning. Emergence of computed tomography (CT) as the gold standard for the diagnosis of ureteral...

Radiological investigation of haematuria in 2016

This paper summarises the current evidence for and use of various imaging modalities for investigating haematuria. The following investigations are reviewed: Intravenous urogram (IVU) – the number of centres still using IVU is decreasing. IVU is cheaper and has less...

I wasn’t expecting that! A series of unexpected radiology findings

Case 1 A 76-year-old diabetic man with a long-term catheter presents to the Emergency Department with rigors and non-specific abdominal pain. He has an elevated white cell count (WCC) and C-reactive protein (CRP). An abdominal and pelvic CT scan was...

Assessment of the incidental adrenal lesion

Introduction The adrenal glands are seen on CT or MRI surrounded by fat in the peri-renal space. The right adrenal gland lies medial to the right lobe of the liver, lateral to the right crus of the diaphragm and superior...

Demanding cases or nightmares in endourology? May/June 2017

In the sixth article in this series the authors describe endourology nightmares involving ileal conduits and calculi. Case 1 A 69-year-old man who had a cystectomy and ileal conduit for muscle invasive bladder cancer, presented with an acute kidney injury...

Indeterminate renal lesions – a pragmatic imaging approach

The incidence of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in the UK has increased steadily over the last two decades, largely driven by the increasing use of abdominal imaging and the incidental detection of small renal lesions [1]. The majority of incidental...

A negative ureteroscopy for stone disease: is it acceptable and is it avoidable?

Urinary tract stone disease and the consequent demand for endoscopic intervention in the upper urinary tract is an increasing phenomenon [1]. Although ureteroscopy is generally considered to be associated with low morbidity [2], risks do exist. Recognised complications include urothelial...