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Ejaculatory dysfunction and the treatment of LUTS

For years ejaculatory dysfunction in men following medical or surgical treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) was thought to be a result of disruption of the bladder neck mechanism and the subsequent retrograde flow of semen. Men commenced on...

Erectile dysfunction part II: treatment

Introduction The identification of specific risk factors associated with erectile dysfunction (ED) allows patients with mild or moderate ED to undergo a series of lifestyle changes, which may provide enough improvement in the erectile function to avoid pharmacotherapies. Cessation of...

Physiotherapy first for pelvic floor dysfunction

Physiotherapy should be included in first-line management options for pelvic organ prolapse and urinary incontinence in women [1,2]. Additionally, referral to physiotherapy is widely practised for the management of urinary incontinence in men, faecal incontinence, defecation disorders and various pelvic...

Ejaculatory dysfunction: a review of current practice and guidelines

Introduction The ejaculatory process is paramount to procreation in nature. It is a complex orchestration of physiology that results in emission of the ejaculate into the posterior urethra followed by ejection of those fluids from the urethra and orgasm. The...

An update on erectile dysfunction guidelines and treatment options

Erectile dysfunction is defined as the persistent inability to attain and / or maintain an erection sufficient for sexual performance. Not only does this have a psychosocial impact, it also affects the quality of life of both the patients and...

Erectile Dysfunction Part I: pathophysiology and risk factors

Introduction Erectile dysfunction (ED) is defined as the inability to achieve and maintain a penile erection, which is adequate for satisfactory sexual intercourse. The Massachusetts Male Ageing Study (MMAS) reported the results of a regional survey of men aged 40–69...

Neuromodulation for lower urinary tract dysfunction – an ICS update

Non-invasive and invasive electro-stimulation techniques have been extensively studied in the treatment of lower urinary tract and bowel dysfunction, including overactive bladder syndrome (OAB), non-obstructive chronic urinary retention, faecal incontinence and chronic pelvic pain. Currently, the most common indication for...

What exactly is Hinman Syndrome?

Who was Hinman and what is Hinman Syndrome? Frank Hinman Junior (1915–2011) first described ‘Hinman syndrome’ in the 1970s – a condition also known as a ‘non-neurogenic neurogenic bladder’. He was a renowned American urologist, educator and skilful artist and...

ICS updates on continence care: making sense of detrusor underactivity and the underactive bladder

Countless epidemiological studies have established the frequent occurrence of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and the significant burden these symptoms incur. For the most part of the past three decades, there has been an overwhelming focus on detrusor overactivity (DO)...

Urological Men’s Health – A guide for Urologists and Primary Care Physicians

Urologists, perhaps more than any other group of clinicians, can quite reasonably lay claim to be the champions for men’s health. But are we particularly well placed to deliver? This text is aimed at primary care physicians and those urologists...

Urodynamics in review: stress urinary incontinence in women produced by the Urodynamics Committee of the ICS

Urodynamic studies (UDS) are the best tools to objectively assess the lower urinary tract dysfunction (LUTD) of various aetiologies [1]. According to the general understanding and consensus of the medical community UDS should be performed only when they will change...