You searched for "dysfunction"

457 results found

Ejaculatory dysfunction and the treatment of LUTS

For years ejaculatory dysfunction in men following medical or surgical treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) was thought to be a result of disruption of the bladder neck mechanism and the subsequent retrograde flow of semen. Men commenced on...

Erectile dysfunction part II: treatment

Introduction The identification of specific risk factors associated with erectile dysfunction (ED) allows patients with mild or moderate ED to undergo a series of lifestyle changes, which may provide enough improvement in the erectile function to avoid pharmacotherapies. Cessation of...

Physiotherapy first for pelvic floor dysfunction

Physiotherapy should be included in first-line management options for pelvic organ prolapse and urinary incontinence in women [1,2]. Additionally, referral to physiotherapy is widely practised for the management of urinary incontinence in men, faecal incontinence, defecation disorders and various pelvic...

Ejaculatory dysfunction: a review of current practice and guidelines

Introduction The ejaculatory process is paramount to procreation in nature. It is a complex orchestration of physiology that results in emission of the ejaculate into the posterior urethra followed by ejection of those fluids from the urethra and orgasm. The...

An update on erectile dysfunction guidelines and treatment options

Erectile dysfunction is defined as the persistent inability to attain and / or maintain an erection sufficient for sexual performance. Not only does this have a psychosocial impact, it also affects the quality of life of both the patients and...

Erectile Dysfunction Part I: pathophysiology and risk factors

Introduction Erectile dysfunction (ED) is defined as the inability to achieve and maintain a penile erection, which is adequate for satisfactory sexual intercourse. The Massachusetts Male Ageing Study (MMAS) reported the results of a regional survey of men aged 40–69...

Ejaculatory dysfunction – too swift, too slow and the no-show

Timing is everything.’ Although an expression most frequently linked to comedy, timing also seems just as critical in the business of sexual climax. Indeed, many men worry about ejaculating. Too soon is embarrassing. Too slow is frustrating. And not ejaculating...

Neuromodulation for lower urinary tract dysfunction – an ICS update

Non-invasive and invasive electro-stimulation techniques have been extensively studied in the treatment of lower urinary tract and bowel dysfunction, including overactive bladder syndrome (OAB), non-obstructive chronic urinary retention, faecal incontinence and chronic pelvic pain. Currently, the most common indication for...

Outcomes of VUR in children with non-neurogenic dysfunction treated with Deflux

The 2010 American Urological Association (AUA) guidelines on primary vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) state that children with VUR and lower urinary tract dysfunction are less likely to have the VUR resolve spontaneously than those with primary VUR alone (31% vs. 61%)....

Reviewing the evidence for TNS in neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction

Tibial nerve stimulation (TNS) is a recognised minimally invasive treatment option for bladder overactivity and non-neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction. In this systematic review, the role TNS can play in the management of neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction is evaluated...

Testosterone Therapy and Sexual Dysfunction