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Imaging and radiology

Case 1 What radiological test is this and what does it show? What is the typical radio-nucleotide used for this study, what is its half-life and how is it excreted? Approximately how long does this study take to perform? What...

Read all about it Sep/Oct 2015

It can be awkward when a patient asks you about a report in their favourite tabloid detailing an amazing research breakthrough or a ‘cutting-edge’ new treatment / test and you don’t know what they are talking about! So this section...

Radiological investigation of haematuria in 2016

This paper summarises the current evidence for and use of various imaging modalities for investigating haematuria. The following investigations are reviewed: Intravenous urogram (IVU) – the number of centres still using IVU is decreasing. IVU is cheaper and has less...

Long-term risks of augmenting the bladder in spina bifida patients

Bladder augmentation is utilised to treat children with neuropathic bladders secondary to spina bifida that results in hostile urodynamics, renal deterioration and / or urinary incontinence. Whilst it is associated with an improved quality of life and low mortality, it...

Radiation in paediatric urology – PURSE study

Urological operative procedures often use fluoroscopy for diagnosis and treatment of stone disease and structural anomalies. Paediatric tissues are sensitive to the effects of ionising radiation. Paediatric radiation safety has gained concerns due to the possible long-term effects such as...

Ureteric strictures

Case 1 What is this investigation? What are the findings of this investigation? What are the causes for this? What are the treatment options? Case 2 Image 1. Image 2. What do these X-Ray KUB films show? What are the...

Loop-tail stents in reducing stent related symptoms – the search continues

Insertion of double J (DJ) stents is one of the most commonly performed procedures in urology. One of its major drawbacks is stent related symptoms (SRS) which has generated a lot of research in drugs, stent design and materials. One...

Clinical visit for PCNL experience: Agra, India

In September 2015, I travelled to India for a two-week clinical visit with Professor Madhu Sudan Agrawal at the Global Rainbow Hospital, Agra. Having completed my training I wanted to further develop my skills with PCNL, particularly with regards to...

(Not very) clean intermittent self catheterisation

In a small room near the operating theatre of the London Hospital sometime in the 1880’s, a surgeon slips off his outdoor frock coat. From his pocket he pulls a silver curved catheter, spits on it and nonchalantly passes it...

‘The Rise of a Specialty’ – Exhibition at the Royal Society of Medicine

The founding of the Royal Society of Medicine’s (RSM) Urology Section 100 years ago this year was crucial to the establishment of urology as a specialty in Great Britain in its own right. To mark this anniversary, earlier this year...

What did the Romans ever do for us?

In this series of articles I am going to show you some of the exhibits contained in the Museum of Urology, hosted on the BAUS website (www.baus.org.uk). Previously in this column, I told you about the Saxons and how they...

Pyonephrosis: is the kidney always doomed?

Pyonephrosis (Greek pyon ‘pus’ + nephros ‘kidney’) is defined in Campbell-Walsh Urology [1] as an infected hydro-nephrosis associated with suppurative destruction of the renal parenchyma which results in total or near total loss of renal function. The true incidence of...